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Advisor to the owners: Kuwait will of the Security Council agreed to lift the sanctions on Baghdad after a meeting April 15

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gente



Members of the parliamentary Foreign optimistic about the salvation of Iraq from Chapter VII

Advisor to the owners: Kuwait will of the Security Council agreed to lift the sanctions on Baghdad after a meeting April 15



Maliki directed to submit to the Commission re-distribution of fuel to the fishermen’s recommendations to support the fishermen’s quotas (the world)

Revealed adviser to Prime Minister of the existence of a crucial meeting between Iraq and Kuwait, leading to a report to the Security Council, including the approval of Kuwait to lift the sanctions on Iraq with the approval of both sides to complete the remaining obligations between the two countries, between a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, the parliamentary Raising Iraq from Chapter VII is not about Kuwait alone, but the conviction of the international community, and political pressure.





The Legal Adviser to the Prime Minister Fadel Muhammad said in an interview with “the world” yesterday that “on 15 of this month will hold a crucial meeting between Iraq and Kuwait to Baghdad to settle all outstanding issues between the two countries,” expected to so they can be very positive results. He added that the Kuwaiti delegation headed by Foreign Minister Mohammed Sabah, the membership of officials and ministers involved in the files of contention between the two countries.

He said Muhammad, “If we reach a joint agreement with Kuwait will send the report to the Security Council, and approved it, with approval from both sides that all that remains of obligations between the two countries from archive missing and the demarcation of the border will be completed in good faith between the two countries, and thus closes the file in the Security Council International, and ending penalties for Iraq under Chapter VII. “

A member of the Committee Mohammad Jamshid in an interview for “the world” yesterday that “the State of Kuwait gave positive signals to remove Iraq from Chapter VII, given to the participation at the Arab summit, not to mention the participation of many Arab countries high.” He added that “the visit of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki to the State of Kuwait, which preceded the summit was very positive, as it achieved its objectives and prompted Kuwait to cooperate with us to rid Iraq from Chapter VII and the political and economic sanctions currently in place.”

He expected Jamshid contribute to the Arab League also freeing Iraq from Chapter VII, “I do not doubt that the Arab League wants an Iraq that influence takes leadership role in the region, Iraq today is not Iraq’s former regime, which was a source of concern and problems for the region. And I expect that there will be a gesture quick to get rid from Chapter VII. “

I take it a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, the parliamentary staff Arshad remove Iraq from Chapter VII that the international community and members of the Security Council specifically, explaining that “the issue of withdrawal of Iraq from Chapter VII is not about Kuwait alone, but there is a UN resolution needs to be pressure from Arab countries and the Arab League “.



gente


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Revealed adviser to Prime Minister of the existence of a crucial meeting between Iraq and Kuwait, leading to a report to the Security Council, including the approval of Kuwait to lift the sanctions on Iraq with the approval of both sides to complete the remaining obligations between the two countries, between a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, the parliamentary Raising Iraq from Chapter VII is not about Kuwait alone, but the conviction of the international community, and political pressure.

The Legal Adviser to the Prime Minister Fadel Muhammad said in an interview with "the world" yesterday that "on 15 of this month will hold a crucial meeting between Iraq and Kuwait to Baghdad to settle all outstanding issues between the two countries," expected to so they can be very positive results. He added that the Kuwaiti delegation headed by Foreign Minister Mohammed Sabah, the membership of officials and ministers involved in the files of contention between the two countries.

He said Muhammad, "If we reach a joint agreement with Kuwait will send the report to the Security Council, and approved it, with approval from both sides that all that remains of obligations between the two countries from archive missing and the demarcation of the border will be completed in good faith between the two countries, and thus closes the file in the Security Council International, and ending penalties for Iraq under Chapter VII. "

A member of the Committee Mohammad Jamshid in an interview for "the world" yesterday that "the State of Kuwait gave positive signals to remove Iraq from Chapter VII, given to the participation at the Arab summit, not to mention the participation of many Arab countries high." He added that "the visit of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki to the State of Kuwait, which preceded the summit was very positive, as it achieved its objectives and prompted Kuwait to cooperate with us to rid Iraq from Chapter VII and the political and economic sanctions currently in place."

He expected Jamshid contribute to the Arab League also freeing Iraq from Chapter VII, "I do not doubt that the Arab League wants an Iraq that influence takes leadership role in the region, Iraq today is not Iraq's former regime, which was a source of concern and problems for the region. And I expect that there will be a gesture quick to get rid from Chapter VII. "

I take it a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, the parliamentary staff Arshad remove Iraq from Chapter VII that the international community and members of the Security Council specifically, explaining that "the issue of withdrawal of Iraq from Chapter VII is not about Kuwait alone, but there is a UN resolution needs to be pressure from Arab countries and the Arab League ".

Panhead


Admin
my thoughts are that the RV will happen prior to Iraq getting out of Chapter7 sanctions....the IMF is useing the leverage to get Iraq to do what and when they want.

gente


I seem to recall an article awhile back that stated Iraq was complaining that the US was holding the archives it needed to appease Kuwait and to move CH7 along...

Panhead


Admin
I domt have them.....lol......these people can sure play the blame game well.

gente


Here's the article I was referring to:

Finding Kuwait's Missing National Archives


01/23/2012



JURIST Guest Columnist Douglas Cox of the City University of New York School of Law says that the Kuwaiti national archives, which were taken by Iraqi forces in 1990, have still not been returned and keep the post-Saddam Iraq under a UN Security Council resolution aimed at having the documents returned...



As the final US military convoy left Iraqi territory last month (http://jurist.org/feature/featured/iraq-war/), the US, along with other members of the UN Security Council, criticized (http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2011/sc10490.doc.htm) Iraq's lack of progress in locating Kuwaiti national archives — the historical records of the nation — that disappeared during Saddam Hussein's 1990 invasion. The issue of the missing Kuwaiti archives is crucial because it remains a central factor keeping the new Iraqi government under the thumb of Security Council Resolution 686 (http://www.fas.org/news/un/iraq/sres/sres0686.htm), now more than two decades old, that was focused on Saddam's regime. Yet the most promising place to find new leads in the cold case of the missing archives is clear — the records of Saddam's government. Why hasn't Iraq yet reviewed these documents? Because the US still has them and continues to withhold them from Iraq.In his report (http://www.dcoxfiles.com/kuwait/s2011754.pdf) to the Security Council last month, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon lamented that Iraq had made "no substantial progress" on the search for Kuwait's missing archives and claimed that there was "no credible information" about their whereabouts. The focus on Iraq's responsibility, however, ignores the substantial intervening effects of the 2003 war and the subsequent, Security Council-endorsed occupation of Iraq.

In particular, Security Council Resolution 1483 (http://www.uncc.ch/resolutio/res1483.pdf) [PDF] in May 2003 recognized the US and the UK as joint occupiers and expressly called upon them to "locate, identify, and repatriate" the "Kuwaiti archives, that the previous regime failed to undertake." This was a crucial period in the search given that detained officials from Saddam's government may have had fresh information about the missing archives. Whether the US interrogated officials from Saddam's regime about them is unclear, although later cables released by Wikileaks feature a UN official repeatedly urging the US to do so.

More importantly, the US utilized its unfettered access throughout Iraq as an occupying power to seize and sequester "miles" of records from offices of Saddam's government. The document seizures were particularly intense due to the search for records of weapons of mass destruction. In total, the US seized some 48,000 boxes of documents in Iraq and transferred them to the Combined Media Processing Center (CMPC) in Qatar. Detailed analysis of the documents, however, was inexplicably slow. As of 2006, for example, less than 15 percent of the seized documents had been fully translated, a backlog that led to the ill-advised, but mercifully short-lived, experiment of uploading thousands of untranslated documents to the Internet.

Given the meticulous record keeping of Saddam's regime, the seized documents in US custody constitute a crucial body of evidence that could still provide either new clues on the fate of the archives or credible confirmation that the trail of Kuwait's missing archives is irretrievably lost. An exhaustive review could disclose, for example, indications that Saddam intentionally destroyed some of the seized Kuwaiti archives or concealed them in government buildings later destroyed in allied bombing runs. A Wikileaks cable notes, for example, that a UN official trying to locate the missing archives, noted that if they had been stored at the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs, they were "probably lost to fire."

The relevance of the captured documents from Iraq to the search is far from speculative. Another Wikileaks cable released last year entitled "Repatriating Kuwaiti Documents to the GOK" reveals that not only did the US seize documents potentially about the missing Kuwaiti archives, it actually swept up portions of the Kuwaiti documents themselves. In the cable, the US Embassy in Kuwait reports that it had "received permission" to repatriate to Kuwait two boxes of documents — including "top secret" Kuwaiti records — found among the documents at the CMPC that were seized by US forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Despite the formal end of the US occupation in 2004, the recent withdrawal of US forces, and the undeniable potential of the seized documents to clarify the fate of Kuwait's national archives, the documents remain in exclusive US custody. When I asked about the legal status of these seized records last year, a defense official replied that the "US government will consider requests from the Government of Iraq to return captured Iraqi governmental documents," and that "the needs of the Iraqi government" for the documents "will be considered." Attempts by Iraq to negotiate with the US for the return of the documents, however, have thus far been unsuccessful. Late last year, one of the Iraqi officials involved in the stalled negotiations even threatened to take the US to court over its failure to return the seized documents.

Moreover, the Operation Iraqi Freedom documents are not the only cache of potentially relevant records. The US also has an additional 300 cubic feet worth of documents it seized during Operation Desert Storm in 1991. The potential relevance of these documents, captured as Iraqi forces fled Kuwait, is even more compelling given they were almost contemporaneous with Iraq's seizure of Kuwait's archives. According to a review by the National Archives and Records Administration, the documents include Iraqi military inventories of certain confiscated Kuwaiti property and other records that could potentially shed light on the fate of Kuwait's archives. Interestingly, the seized documents also include records of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). It is difficult to understand why Iraqi forces fleeing Kuwait would have GCC records, especially given that Iraq was not a member, unless these too were seized from Kuwait, which was. Neither Iraq nor Kuwait, however, will ever recover the
originals of these records, which the US destroyed in 2002 due to mold contamination, but the US could still provide electronic copies.

While the importance the Security Council attaches to the tragedy of Kuwait's missing archives is laudable, its use of the issue to continue enforcement of Saddam-era Security Council resolutions against the new Iraq is not. It is a final, and unfortunate, irony that Iraq's ability to comply at last with Security Council demands to restore the "historical memory" of Kuwait, is hamstrung by its inability to access its own. It is time for the US and the Security Council to reexamine responsibility for the search for Kuwait's archives anew and refrain from making the new Iraq, like Kuwait, a continuing victim of Saddam's legacy.

Douglas Cox is the International Law Librarian and Associate Professor at the City University of New York School of Law. His previous law library experience includes assisting inmates in the jail law libraries at Rikers Island and providing legal reference assistance at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Since 2005 he has made numerous visits to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba assisting in the representation of detainees litigating petitions for habeas corpus. He blogs about captured documents, archives, armed conflict and international law at Document Exploitation (http://www.docexblog.com/).

Suggested citation: Douglas Cox, Finding Kuwait's Missing National Archives, JURIST - Forum, Jan. 23, 2012, http://jurist.org/forum/2012/01/douglas-cox-kuwait-archives.php.



This article was prepared for publication by Ben Klaber, a senior editor for JURIST's academic commentary service. Please direct any questions or comments to him at academiccommentary@jurist.org

January 23, 2012






http://jurist.org/forum/2012/01/douglas-cox-kuwait-archives.php (http://jurist.org/forum/2012/01/douglas-cox-kuwait-archives.php)



Last edited by gente on Tue Apr 03, 2012 8:26 pm; edited 1 time in total

gente


Here's more on this:



Iraq delivers 136 Micro film from the archives of newspaper Kuwait in the presence of United Nations



Author: ZJ Editor: CC | HL Wednesday 22 شباط 2012 14:39 GMT
Kuwait City as it looked from the sea
Sumerian News / Baghdad

Announced that the Iraqi embassy in Kuwait on Wednesday that Iraq handed the Kuwaiti side 136 Micro film from the archives of the official Kuwaiti newspaper today.

He said the Iraqi ambassador to Kuwait, Mohammad Hussein Bahr al-Ulum said in an interview for "Alsumaria News", "Iraq peace, the first Monday .136 Micro film from the archives of newspaper Kuwait today to official Kuwaiti side," noting that "the process of delivery took place in the presence of representative of the United Nations in Iraq. "

Bahr al-Ulum said that "Iraq has attributed some of the earlier coins of the Central Bank and returns some of the Kuwaiti government departments, such as the archive Kuwait and Telovesjunh Radio National."

Bahr al-Ulum said that "one of the terms of resolution 833 issued by the United Nations provides for the return of private property and lost property belonging to Kuwait, which had lost during the regime of Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait," adding that "Iraq is working in earnest to fulfill its obligations to Kuwait."

Iraq has since 1990 under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations imposed after the invasion of the regime of President Saddam Hussein of Kuwait in August of the same year, this item allows the use of force against Iraq as a threat to international security, in addition to large amounts of frozen assets of financial international banks for the payment of compensation to those affected by the invasion of Kuwait.

Kuwait had asked the UN Security Council, in July of 2009, before its meeting to discuss Iraq's international obligations not to remove Iraq from the list of Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations before Aevaúh all its obligations, especially in the cases of compensation, prisoners and missing Kuwaitis, stressing the need to respect Iraq with resolution 833 judge the demarcation of the border between Iraq and Kuwait after the Iraqi objections that appear from time to time on the demarcation of the border, and then reiterated the same demands on the lips of a number of Kuwaiti parliament.

The file border disputes and oil between Iraq and Kuwait, began after Britain decided in 1961 granting the independence of Kuwait, and the rejection of the late Prime Minister Abdul Karim Qassim, recognition, and called on then to the annexation of Kuwait to spend Basra, despite the recognition of the Iraqi government, dominated by the party in 1963 after the Baath regime overthrow Abdul Karim Kassem, the independence of Kuwait deal said by some historians that it was against the Iraqi government to give money because of the deficit, which was suffering, but the former president Saddam Hussein, who belongs to the same party, he decided on the second of August 1990 invasion Kuwait on the background of problems on the border and Tsmha and conflict on some oil wells.

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